REVIEW: Helikon EDC Side Bag

REVIEW: Helikon EDC Side Bag

Shoulder bags are often the unloved stepchild of tactical and utilitarian outdoor gear. They have to function well in that narrow range between “just put it in your pocket” and “you’ll need a rucksack”. I do use them, but they have to work hard to earn their place in my kit loadout. Continue reading

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REVIEW: Helikon-Tex Bushcraft Satchel

REVIEW: Helikon-Tex Bushcraft Satchel

It won’t take long to run through the features of this bag – but that is, I suppose, a feature in itself; the Helikon-Tex Bushcraft Satchel is pretty simple.

There’s an unpadded adjustable shoulder strap running between two clips, and slightly curved ‘ends’ where these clips attach. There is no padding anywhere on the bag, and it hangs symettrically – it isn’t contoured or ‘handed’ to fit on one side of the body or other. Continue reading

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REVIEW: Wisport Raccoon 45L Rucksack

REVIEW: Wisport Raccoon 45L Rucksack

Wisport is one of those brands I had heard of or seen in product catalogues and on websites, but had no direct experience of. Military 1st offered the Wisport Raccoon 45L rucksack to me to try out on some of our courses and I gladly took the opportunity. It’s not like I NEED another rucksack, but it’s a different style to what I am used to and I was curious to see how it performed. Continue reading

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REVIEW: First Tactical Tactix 1-Day Plus Bag

REVIEW: First Tactical Tactix 1-Day Plus Bag

From a distance the First Tactical Tactix 1-Day Plus looks like pretty much any other MOLLE daypack – webbing systems along the vertical surfaces, zipped compartments and compression straps. I admit to having a bit of a prejudice towards MOLLE packs. The MOLLE/PALS system (Modular Light Load carrying Equipment) works well with small packs and pouches, and is great for quickly changing the gear carried on say, body armour or a tactical vest. It doesn’t work as well when it comes to… Continue reading

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REVIEW: Fjallraven Kaipak 58 Rucksack

REVIEW: Fjallraven Kaipak 58 Rucksack

There is enough padding on the waist and shoulders for them not to be noticed, but it doesn’t seem excessive. For one overnight trip with clients the overall ‘wet’ weight of the pack (including food, water and camera kit) was around 17kg and our reviewer was not left wanting more foam between the straps and my body. The adjustment for both the waist and shoulders stays in place once set, which is more than can be said for many packs on the market. Continue reading

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