Axe Safety Basics – Simple rules for using an axe safely in the woods, at camp or at home

Axe Safety Basics – Simple rules for using an axe safely in the woods, at camp or at home

Axes are great. I use them every week, and have been swinging them around for at least 20 years. They are versatile tools, and as important as a crafting item as an outdoor safety/survival tool. I couldn’t do my job without one. Continue reading

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Certificated Foraging Courses in North Wales

Certificated Foraging Courses in North Wales

Our foraging course has been by far our most popular public skills course for a decade now. Alongside those public course dates we have been training chefs, outdoor instructors and group leaders in the basic skills of foraging – plant and fungi identification, use of guidebooks, how to use and process plants and the laws that cover foraging and the picking of wild plants in the UK. We have also covered the acquisition of wild protein – both inland and on the coast, including shooting, fishing and how to cook and prepare what you gather. Continue reading

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Wild Camping Food – What should I take?

Wild Camping Food – What should I take?

This is a common question from clients who are heading out for their first ‘wild’ camping trips in the mountains and forests of the UK – what am I going to eat?

We have normally gone through the laws of wild camping and taken a good look at the other parts of the equipment list, but food can sometimes be a bit of an afterthought. Wet or dry, bought or made – and just how much do I need to bring? Continue reading

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REVIEW: Mountain Equipment Firefly Down Sleeping Bag

REVIEW: Mountain Equipment Firefly Down Sleeping Bag

I reviewed the 2019 Mountain Equipment Firefly down sleeping bag for UK outdoor news and discussion site UKHillwalking.com. It’s small, light and cleverly designed – but is it warm enough for a Welsh spring? Continue reading

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Can I pick wild flowers in the U.K.? When is it illegal?

Can I pick wild flowers in the U.K.? When is it illegal?

In this blog post I will do my best to explain it, pick out the relevant parts of the legislation and steer a forager, bushcrafter or ethnobotanist in what is (hopefully) the right direction.
At the bottom of this blog post is the shortened explanation (a tl;dr), but for those who want to know exactly where that came from here are some blocks of legal text:

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REVIEW: Country Innovation Woodlark Waterproof Smock

REVIEW: Country Innovation Woodlark Waterproof Smock

After reviewing their Raptor waistcoat I was contacted by UK brand Country Innovation to take an early look at their brand new waterproof smock design – the Woodlark. It’s listed on the Country Innovation website as being “made from a tough cotton outer fabric, which, when combined with the waterproof/breathable lining, offers great protection from wind and rain“.

With the wet and windy months of December and January coming up I accepted the offer and did my very best to try and kill, or at least maim, this waterproof outer layer. I was mildly surprised with how good the Raptor waistcoat was, so would I be as impressed with a sub-£300 waterproof from a smaller British brand?

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REVIEW: Grayl Ultralight Water Filter

REVIEW: Grayl Ultralight Water Filter

Water filters are becoming increasingly popular in the Uk hiking and outdoors market, and what was once seen as a niche item for overseas travel and expeditions are now starting to be habitually carried in the UK by adventurers of all types.
The Grayl Ultralight purifier bottle is a bit of a hybrid between a filtration bottle and something that can be used to transfer that cleaned water to another container – something that dedicated water filter/purifier bottles often struggle with.
I have been trying it out since late summer, using it on wild camping trips and expeditions with clients in Snowdonia, the Lake District and Scotland. Continue reading

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Examining a wild camp site – tracking and reading the ground

Examining a wild camp site – tracking and reading the ground

So there I was, wandering through the woods with the dog. This is one of several woodland sites that we occasionally rent to run some of our bushcraft, survival and other wilderness skills courses in North Wales. I am far from any of the footpaths, both the public ones and the ones made by locals through the trees. It’s about 15 minutes after sunset and the light is poor – nearly time for the head torch. Continue reading

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17 Different ways of making fire

17 Different ways of making fire
17 Different Ways of Making Fire A selection of natural and artificial ignition sources, tinders and accelerants to help with your next fire Anybody who has attended one of our bushcraft, survival or campcraft courses will know that when we teach the skills of firecraft and firelightingRead more...

Pacing, timing or ticking off – measuring distance when navigating on foot

Pacing, timing or ticking off – measuring distance when navigating on foot

On our navigation courses we always end up coming around to the subject of distance. Indeed, it’s one of the ‘D’s of navigation and unless you intend to just stand still and survey the surrounding countryside you’ll need to deal with the problem of measuring distance both on the map and on foot at some point or another.

There are three ways that we cover in depth on the EST Framework navigation courses – ‘pacing‘, ‘timing‘ and the enigmatically named ‘ticking off‘. They each have their merits, but also a few drawbacks. Like pretty much every other navigational technique – they are just a tool in the toolkit, and it is up to you to select the right one for the right task Continue reading

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UK Wild Camping Laws Explained

UK Wild Camping Laws Explained

Can I Wild Camp in the U.K?
Good question. I suppose it depends on what you mean by ‘can’.

If you mean ‘is it physically possible to find somewhere to camp?‘ then of course the answer is ‘yes’. I wild camp somewhere in the UK about once per month and have a decent success rate. I have been camping in the mountains and forests and on the coastline of the UK since I was about 18 Continue reading

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The Six-Bundle Fire Lay

The Six-Bundle Fire Lay

This fire lay requires six bundles of dry, straight dead wood and a good ignition source. It relies on good airflow at the beginning, and the fire lay ‘collapsing’ in on itself in the later stages to ensure a good bed of coals and ash to cook over.

It is also a good option for making a ‘One Match Fire’. Continue reading

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REVIEW: Helikon-Tex Bushcraft Satchel

REVIEW: Helikon-Tex Bushcraft Satchel

It won’t take long to run through the features of this bag – but that is, I suppose, a feature in itself; the Helikon-Tex Bushcraft Satchel is pretty simple.

There’s an unpadded adjustable shoulder strap running between two clips, and slightly curved ‘ends’ where these clips attach. There is no padding anywhere on the bag, and it hangs symettrically – it isn’t contoured or ‘handed’ to fit on one side of the body or other. Continue reading

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Survival Tips for Travellers

Survival Tips for Travellers

As you have probably guessed – what Lonely Planet wanted was somebody to write some unique content for them (for free) and then for them to make money from selling that content as one of the ‘expert voices’ in the book. Apparently they “never pay interviewees (they benefit in terms of exposure)“. Well, quite. Exposure can be a dangerous thing – too much of it and it can kill you. That’s why our survival courses always include some training in awareness and prevention of hypothermia.

However, it prompted me to write this post – are there any generic survival tips I can give for people travelling the globe? Something quick and easy to read and as applicable to someone travelling to Mongolia as it would be to Mali? Tips that would work in Belgium or Belize?

It turns out I can. So here are some of those top travelling survival tips – given away to you for free – but I like you, so it’s OK. Continue reading

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REVIEW: Country Innovation Raptor Waistcoat

REVIEW: Country Innovation Raptor Waistcoat

Photography waistcoats like this are basically load-carrying vests and systems for a very civilian market, and the Raptor waistcoat from Country Innovation seems to be pitched straight at that market of photographers, birdwatchers and anybody who regularly points optics at wildlife.
I admit from the start that Country Innovation was a new brand for me, but a quick look through their website shows that their kit is trusted by the outdoor and wildlife photographers that I admire – so if it’s good enough for the likes of Simon King and Bill Oddie then it might be good enough for a scruffy outdoor instructor in North Wales? Continue reading

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