REVIEW: Keela Merino Long Sleeve Top

REVIEW: Keela Merino Long Sleeve Top

I only discovered Merino baselayers a few years ago when I picked up a long sleeved tee in the sales. I wore it so much that Christmas resulted in a second slightly heavier weight long sleeved tee ended up in my wardrobe. These two have served me well and given me a real love for merino wool which has stretched to my feet also. When the opportunity arose to invest in a Keela Merino long sleeve top, nothing could stand in my way. Continue reading

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Learn a new skill in 2020 with Original Outdoors!

Learn a new skill in 2020 with Original Outdoors!

In this, the first proper week of January (let’s face it, the bit before everyone goes back to work doesn’t count) we are all bombarded by messages trying to flog us gym memberships, holidays to far-flung corners of the earth or just a thing to wear on your wrist that tells you if you’re tired yet. Continue reading

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You’ve just completed your Mountain Navigation course – what next?

You’ve just completed your Mountain Navigation course – what next?

This blog post is primarily aimed at those who have just attended one of our Level 2 (Mountain) Navigation courses, either on a public course or as a private client. That doesn’t mean that the information below is ONLY of relevance to those who have just visited us in North Wales, but that is the intended audience. Continue reading

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REVIEW: Helikon EDC Side Bag

REVIEW: Helikon EDC Side Bag

Shoulder bags are often the unloved stepchild of tactical and utilitarian outdoor gear. They have to function well in that narrow range between “just put it in your pocket” and “you’ll need a rucksack”. I do use them, but they have to work hard to earn their place in my kit loadout. Continue reading

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REVIEW: Polymath Products OmniTorch

REVIEW: Polymath Products OmniTorch

A few weeks ago I was asked a very pertinent question:

“Do you really need another sodding torch?”

Open on my browser was the page on the TRC Outdoors website for the Polymath Products OmniTorch – a cube-shaped LED cliplight with multiple attachment options. I have enough LED lighting scattered around the office and my truck to light up the Western Hemisphere. Do I need to spend £12.99 on another lighting source? Continue reading

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Lost on Snowdon? Find a fence.

Lost on Snowdon? Find a fence.

If you have visited the mountains of Snowdonia, in particular the area around Snowdon itself, you will probably have come across one of these small, blue circular plaques pinned to a gatepost or stile. Their purpose is fairly self-explanatory, with “CYFEIRNOD GRID/GRID REFERENCE” printed around the edge. Continue reading

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How to choose the right map scale – 25k, 40k or 50k?

How to choose the right map scale – 25k, 40k or 50k?

There are two mapping scales that tend to be used for walking, mountaineering and other human-powered travels across the landscape in the UK – 1:25,000 and 1:50,000 scales. The main producer of topographical maps for outdoor activities (and everything else) is the Ordnance Survey (OS), and the 1:25,000 (Explorer) and 1:50,000 (Landranger) scales are readily available at outdoor shops, online and local retailers. They also produce various digital mapping products, as well as an online mapping service and smartphone app. Continue reading

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Pacing, timing or ticking off – measuring distance when navigating on foot

Pacing, timing or ticking off – measuring distance when navigating on foot

On our navigation courses we always end up coming around to the subject of distance. Indeed, it’s one of the ‘D’s of navigation and unless you intend to just stand still and survey the surrounding countryside you’ll need to deal with the problem of measuring distance both on the map and on foot at some point or another.

There are three ways that we cover in depth on the EST Framework navigation courses – ‘pacing‘, ‘timing‘ and the enigmatically named ‘ticking off‘. They each have their merits, but also a few drawbacks. Like pretty much every other navigational technique – they are just a tool in the toolkit, and it is up to you to select the right one for the right task Continue reading

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Which is more accurate – mils or degrees?

Which is more accurate – mils or degrees?
Which is more accurate - mils or degrees? When folk book on to our mountain navigation courses we send a kit list over which includes something along the lines of "compass suitable for taking bearings, the baseplate type such as the Silva Type 4 is ideal". WeRead more...