Axe Safety Basics – Simple rules for using an axe safely in the woods, at camp or at home

Axe Safety Basics – Simple rules for using an axe safely in the woods, at camp or at home

Axes are great. I use them every week, and have been swinging them around for at least 20 years. They are versatile tools, and as important as a crafting item as an outdoor safety/survival tool. I couldn’t do my job without one. Continue reading

Read more...

Can I pick wild flowers in the U.K.? When is it illegal?

Can I pick wild flowers in the U.K.? When is it illegal?

In this blog post I will do my best to explain it, pick out the relevant parts of the legislation and steer a forager, bushcrafter or ethnobotanist in what is (hopefully) the right direction.
At the bottom of this blog post is the shortened explanation (a tl;dr), but for those who want to know exactly where that came from here are some blocks of legal text:

Continue reading

Read more...

How to choose the right map scale – 25k, 40k or 50k?

How to choose the right map scale – 25k, 40k or 50k?

There are two mapping scales that tend to be used for walking, mountaineering and other human-powered travels across the landscape in the UK – 1:25,000 and 1:50,000 scales. The main producer of topographical maps for outdoor activities (and everything else) is the Ordnance Survey (OS), and the 1:25,000 (Explorer) and 1:50,000 (Landranger) scales are readily available at outdoor shops, online and local retailers. They also produce various digital mapping products, as well as an online mapping service and smartphone app. Continue reading

Read more...

Examining a wild camp site – tracking and reading the ground

Examining a wild camp site – tracking and reading the ground

So there I was, wandering through the woods with the dog. This is one of several woodland sites that we occasionally rent to run some of our bushcraft, survival and other wilderness skills courses in North Wales. I am far from any of the footpaths, both the public ones and the ones made by locals through the trees. It’s about 15 minutes after sunset and the light is poor – nearly time for the head torch. Continue reading

Read more...

17 Different ways of making fire

17 Different ways of making fire
17 Different Ways of Making Fire A selection of natural and artificial ignition sources, tinders and accelerants to help with your next fire Anybody who has attended one of our bushcraft, survival or campcraft courses will know that when we teach the skills of firecraft and firelightingRead more...

Pacing, timing or ticking off – measuring distance when navigating on foot

Pacing, timing or ticking off – measuring distance when navigating on foot

On our navigation courses we always end up coming around to the subject of distance. Indeed, it’s one of the ‘D’s of navigation and unless you intend to just stand still and survey the surrounding countryside you’ll need to deal with the problem of measuring distance both on the map and on foot at some point or another.

There are three ways that we cover in depth on the EST Framework navigation courses – ‘pacing‘, ‘timing‘ and the enigmatically named ‘ticking off‘. They each have their merits, but also a few drawbacks. Like pretty much every other navigational technique – they are just a tool in the toolkit, and it is up to you to select the right one for the right task Continue reading

Read more...

The Six-Bundle Fire Lay

The Six-Bundle Fire Lay

This fire lay requires six bundles of dry, straight dead wood and a good ignition source. It relies on good airflow at the beginning, and the fire lay ‘collapsing’ in on itself in the later stages to ensure a good bed of coals and ash to cook over.

It is also a good option for making a ‘One Match Fire’. Continue reading

Read more...

Survival Tips for Travellers

Survival Tips for Travellers

As you have probably guessed – what Lonely Planet wanted was somebody to write some unique content for them (for free) and then for them to make money from selling that content as one of the ‘expert voices’ in the book. Apparently they “never pay interviewees (they benefit in terms of exposure)“. Well, quite. Exposure can be a dangerous thing – too much of it and it can kill you. That’s why our survival courses always include some training in awareness and prevention of hypothermia.

However, it prompted me to write this post – are there any generic survival tips I can give for people travelling the globe? Something quick and easy to read and as applicable to someone travelling to Mongolia as it would be to Mali? Tips that would work in Belgium or Belize?

It turns out I can. So here are some of those top travelling survival tips – given away to you for free – but I like you, so it’s OK. Continue reading

Read more...

COURSE REPORT: Woodcrafter Course July 2018

COURSE REPORT: Woodcrafter Course July 2018
COURSE REPORT: Woodcrafter Course July 2018 The Woodcrafter - our original and long-established 2-day bushcraft and campcraft course - remains one of our most popular courses. The July 2018 course was a mixture of rain, sun and smoke - but everyone seemed to survive and have aRead more...

Why tracking doesn’t work for misper SAR in the UK

Why tracking doesn’t work for misper SAR in the UK

Here we go… this post will attract a minimum of two types of response:

1. “you don’t know what you’re talking about, if your skills were as good as mine you could follow a flea across a glacier”
2. “tracking is too slow/doesn’t work/is overrated”

Well, quite.

Both views have some validity, and that’s the point of this post.

Tracking, within the context of SAR/non-combat scenarios, is often represented by evangelists who want to present tracking as a panacea to locating any human OR by those who have sworn off it having tried the techniques (sold to them on a course) on a live operation and found that it just slows everything down and eats up resources. Each side will defend their own hilltop to the last man – neither attitude being actually that helpful to achieving the end goa Continue reading

Read more...

Which is more accurate – mils or degrees?

Which is more accurate – mils or degrees?
Which is more accurate - mils or degrees? When folk book on to our mountain navigation courses we send a kit list over which includes something along the lines of "compass suitable for taking bearings, the baseplate type such as the Silva Type 4 is ideal". WeRead more...